2012 August Newsletter  

DOOR COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
1926 – 86 YEARS PRESERVING DOOR COUNTY HISTORY – 2012
MEETING NOTICE AND NEWSLETTER
AUGUST, 2012
Our Mission: The Door County Historical Society strives to collect, maintain and share the history and heritage of Door County through preservation, education and programming.
Our Vision: We envision a Door County Historical Society that is committed to keeping history alive for future generations through collection, preservation and sharing of the heritage of Door County.

MONDAY, AUGUST 27, 2012
6:30 pm

THE HISTORICAL VILLAGE AT CROSSROADS

RESERVATIONS DUE BY AUGUST 20
DINNER: Ham, beef and turkey sandwiches, assorted sides/salads, apple and cherry pie squares catered by Econo Foods
$10.00
PROGRAM: Dedication of Schopf House
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Dear Friends,
Your Society is undergoing changes. During the past several months we have reviewed and put into effect a new business plan. Glenn Timmerman has agreed to become our new Director of Operations. Because of growth and the complexities of managing a growing organization, this move became necessary. We have already implemented a new accounting system and the benefits are already apparent. With this new organization we will be better able to fulfill our Vision and Mission. As we look to the future, we need to coordinate our member services and our community outreach.
You will be fully informed of all our activities. By the September meeting we should be able to give you a full update. Of course, you will need to approve all our actions, because our By-laws will need to be updated at our annual meeting.
Be sure to stop by the Lighthouse and Village and get to know what‘s going on. You will be both informed and enlightened. They are free to members.
Stop by the Hanson House. Our groundskeeper, Mary Ann Bennett, has done a great job. While the house is not finished, walk around and get a feel for the place. And see our new sign. Have a great summer.

George Evenson, President
Door County Historical Society

(If the label on your envelope is highlighted, your 2012 dues have not been paid.)
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DINNER RESERVATION FORM
We must receive your reservation by August 20
NO REFUNDS OR PHONE RESERVATIONS, PLEASE
NAME _________________________________________________________________
SPOUSE/GUEST_________________________________________________________
PHONE __________________
NUMBER ATTENDING _____ X $10.00 DINNER AMOUNT _________________
2012 MEMBERSHIP FORM
INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP: $15.00 ________________________
HUSBAND/WIFE MEMBERSHIP: $25.00 __________________
INDIVIDUAL LIFE MEMBERSHIP: $150.00 __________________
I (we) would like to make an additional
donation to the DCHS __________________ TOTAL ENCLOSED: ____________________
MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: DOOR COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
SEND TO: PO BOX 71, STURGEON BAY, WI 54235

Notes from the Curator…

The history of lighthouses is fascinating, and for many of our visitors, enchanting and romantic. But as I have delved more deeply into the stories of the lighthouses and their keepers, I am drawn into the personal histories of the men and women who worked and lived their jobs, literally.
Although lighthouse history is male-dominated, most recently I have become fascinated by the story of the women who lived and worked at the lighthouse. What about these remarkable mothers, wives, and sisters who stood tall, working side-by-side the men in their lives. Well, let me tell you…the story of the women in the American lighthouses is stunning. So let me share with you a bit of history.
Serving alongside their husbands, brothers, and fathers, women performed in a multitude of ways without benefit of financial compensation. Julia Duclon, the wife of the second Eagle Bluff lighthouse keeper, was a perfect example of the supportive wife.
Julia raised seven sons, kept a spotless home, sewed quilts, baked an average of 14 loaves of bread a day, and was well-known for her hospitality and kindness. The daughter of a lighthouse keeper, Ambrose Davenport of Mackinaw Island, we can assume “she knew what she was getting into” when her husband William became a keeper shortly after their marriage. (Her father may have suggested “have I got a job for you!”)
Had her William been disabled, suffer an illness, or pass on while employed as a keeper, it can be assumed Julia would have been named his replacement. And from my research, it appears women were paid the same amount as their male counterparts. Julia, however, was never called upon to assume her husband’s position, and she never received the title “assistant keeper” or the paycheck that accompanied the title.
The identities of the countless unnamed women who silently served have been lost to history, but in honor of all of them, let us remember and honor…Kate Walker of the isolated donut-shaped lighthouse a mile from Staten Island. And Mary Terry, the keeper at Sand Point Light Station at Escanaba, Michigan, who died at 69 years of age when the lighthouse caught fire. Or Abbie Burgess at Matinicus Rock Light Station, whose heroism saved the light when as a child she kept the lamp lit for ships passing below the lighthouse during a life-stealing storm. Valiant women all, who served because it was not only their duty, but because it was the right thing to do.

Patti Podgers
Eagle Bluff Lighthouse Curator/Manager

REPORT FROM THE HISTORICAL VILLAGE

I am happy to report that the past two Sundays have had very good attendance which will help us catch up and ultimately exceed last year’s attendance. We’re lagging a bit behind last year largely because we endured some exceedingly hot Sundays which surely did not help. There are, however, some programs coming soon which will surely help us catch up. Most notably, “The History of the Washington Island Ferry”, The Cherryland ‘A’s Model A day, and the “Craft and Produce day.” Those will be likely good draws. The other programs are very worthy as well. For all intents and purposes all is going well with the Village but my one frustration is getting Volunteers to commit to respond positively. It is very disconcerting when some don’t bother to respond to my emails or phone messages I leave. This isn’t true of all volunteers, for sure. But it is for some and it perplexes me. This is surely not new to me! After 40 years in my professional life as a clergyman, I know what it’s like getting people to say “yes”! I’m glad I’m not calling for them to give money!!!! All of that notwithstanding, I plan to make this the best season on record. I do not give up easily! I appreciate your support!

Cordially,

Dan G Olson
Manager
The Historical Village at the Crossroads

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