June 2011 Newsletter  

Greetings Friends,

As president of the DCHS I often get calls to share advice to help with projects.  Last January I received a call from a friend in Sevastopol.  It seems a group of citizens wanted to start a Sevastopol Historical Association, and they asked if I would help.  Since Sevastopol has been my home for 82 years, it seemed like the right thing to do.  So after a couple of meetings, we now have a group of interested folks who will focus on the history of our town.

Now you might ask why have another historical society when we already have a county group.  Our society tneds to focus on county issues — the overlal large picture so to speak.  These smaller groups tend to focus on the small picture and thus tend to study and preserve the details.  For example, they explore the history of families and places that have made up the community for the last generation or so.  You can believe me when I tell you the rural communities change very much in 50 years.  Prominent families have disappeared and farmsteads are gone.  Nothing remains but perhaps a lilac bush standing in the middle of a large field.  These town stories are an important part of our history, and unless we attempt to save them, we are missing an opportunity to preserve an important story of our community.  We must start now because soon, within a generation, much will be forgotten and gone forever.  We owe this to our forefathers, and our children.

George Evenson, President – Door County Historical Society

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

THE HISTORICAL VILLAGE AT CROSSROADS AT BIG CREEK, AT THE CORNER OF MICHIGAN AND HIGHWAY 42, KITTYCORNER FROM THE “Y,” BEGINS IT’S SUMMER SUNDAY PROGRAMMING ON JUNE 19TH WITH THE SOUND OF MUSIC.  THE COMMUNITY SYMPHONIC BAND, UNDER THE DIRECTION OF PAULA EGGERT, WILL ENTERTAIN THE VISISTORS WITH A WIDE REPERTOIRE OF MUSIC WITH SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE.  THE BAND HAS BECOME A POPULAR MUSICAL GROUP IN THE COMMUNITY.  ADMISSION TO THE VILLAGE IS FREE.  THE HOURS ARE FROM 1:30-3:00 PM.  HELP CELEBRATE THE OPENING DAY.  BRING YOUR LAWN CHAIRS OR BLANKETS TO ENJOY THE BAND ON THE LAWN IN THE CENTER OF THE VILLAGE.  WE’LL HAVE POPCORN AND BEVERAGES TO GO ALONG WITH THE CONCERT.  SEE YOU THERE!!

2011 HISTORICAL VILLAGE PROGRAMMING

June 19     Community Symphonic Band

June 26     “Wild Cat Joe” Marden – Eldor Kaiser/Blacksmith

July 3        “The Civil War” — Joe Knaapen

July 10    “Norwegian Heritage Day”  — Sons of Norway

July 17     Quilt Show w/Bake Sale/Blacksmith

July 24     “The Importance of Walking and Walking Sticks — Carl Scholz

                     Father Tony & HIs Famous Chickents

July 31     “The Warren House Living History”  — Gerald and Nan Krause

Aug 7       “Old Time Gospel Hymns” — Acoustic Guitar and Voice

Aug 15     “Belgian Heritage Day” — Barb Chisholm

Aug 21      “”New Day Singers” / Blacksmith

Aug 28      “The Role Women in the History of Ephraim” — Paul Burton

Sept 4        Cherryland A’s Model A Ford Club

Sept 11      “”Bones Boys” — Trombone Troupe

Sept 18       Blacksmith

Sept 25      Lumberjack Demonstration

Oct 2          Book Signing:  “Vintage Gardens of Wisconsin,” — Lee Sommerville

Oct 16       Blacksmith

(Dan & Deb Swanson:  Organizing 2-3 “Kid’s Days”)

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Notes from the curator of Eagle Bluff Lighthouse

In 1993, Lighthouse Digest created the Doomsday List “in an effort to draw attention to endangered lighthouses,”  sadly, a good number of the lighthouses on that first list have been destroyed and lost forever.  Some lighthouses, including Green Island’s light across the bay, have been removed from the list because their condition so deteriorated that they were beyond salvation.

While the Doomsday List continues to grow, there are bright lights in the foggy night.  Among the lighthouses receiving a face lift are Plum and Pilot’s Islands’ lights, whose “friends” work tirelessly to save the beams and their buildings.  And a recent Lighthouse Digest article offered hope for Green Island’s light as developers propose the rebuilding of the lighthouse.

It was, therefore, with incredible wisdom and vision that the Door County Historical Society volunteers set to work more than 50 years ago to preserve the Eagle Bluff Lighthouse.  If not for their dedication and foresight, our stubby little lighthouse might well be on the Doomsday List, its beautiful Milwaukee cream brick crumbling into the bay.  They certainly were planning for the future!

But maintaining an aging lighthouse is no small task, and Eagle Bluff is no exception.  So the DCHS board has planned a schedule to refurbish the lighthouse over the next two years; this year the winter kitchen received a face lift . . . the walls plastered and painted, the floor refinished.  The historical photographs have been reframed under archival glass and will be hung in the kitchen to help orient visitors to the lighthouse.  Each room will eventually be reviewed and historically “corrected.”  The to-do list will certainly keep me out of trouble!

As of June 3rd, Eagle Bluff Lighthouse Museum is open for the season. . . though some of the boxes will not be unpacked.  We hope you can visit us.  The staff is looking forward to meeting or new membership.

Patti Podgers, Eagle Bluff Lighthouse Museum Curator/Manager

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